Glennis Wyatt

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Give Your Deck A Facelift

Posted On: April 10th, 2020 4:18PM

Hanging out with your family or hosting friends on your old, dingy deck is not very appealing. Lucky for you, refreshing it doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive. Try your hand at the makeover ideas below!

 

Restore your decking. Depending on the shape it’s in, sometimes all your deck needs is a little love. If it’s still fairly new, your deck might just need a deep cleaning and a new coat of sealant. There is a multitude of deck finishing and cleaning solutions on the market to choose from to achieve this. However, if it's more worn down, the rejuvenation process may be a bit longer, including searching for larger repairs, tightening any hardware, giving it a good cleaning, applying a stain, sealant, and paint, and more.

 

Add lighting. Ambient lighting can completely transform your outside space into a relaxing, cozy oasis. Consider adding solar lights that don’t require a plugin or battery replacement. The lights turn on automatically when the sun sets, making your deck come alive. You can also consider paper lanterns, rope lights, mason jar lamps, or small twinkle lights, depending on the style and mood you’d like to set.

 

Build a privacy screen. Privacy screens come in all styles, shapes, and sizes. Consider purchasing and installing bamboo fencing or lattice panels for a quick and easy solution. Or, if you are feeling a little more adventurous, you can build a wooden frame and grow climbing plants or vines or stretch outdoor fabric in between. Whichever route you end up choosing, make sure you get the most out of your efforts by evaluating all lines sight before building.

 

Home Equity. Getting a home equity line of credit allows you to borrow money against the value of your home. You receive usually up to 80 percent of your home’s value, minus the amount of your loan.

Retirement Funds. Homeowners can consider pulling money from a 401K or IRA account, even though they aren’t specifically meant to cover a home renovation. This option might incur additional penalties or tax payments, but maybe worth it when making improvements that will benefit them financially in the long run.

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5 Criteria for Pricing a Home

Posted On: March 4th, 2020 9:34PM

When you put your home up for sale, one of the best ways to determine the asking price is to look at comparable sales. There’s rarely a perfect apples-to-apples comparison, so a pricing decision often relies on comparisons to several recent sales in the area. Here are five criteria to look for in a sales comparison.

  1. Location: Homes in the same neighborhood typically follow the same market trends. Comparing your home to another in the same neighborhood is a good start, but comparing it to homes on the same street or block is even better.

  2. Date of sale: It varies by location, but housing markets can see a ton of fluctuation in a short time period. It‘s best to use the most recent sales data available.

  3. Home build: Look for homes with similar architectural styles, numbers of bathrooms and bedrooms, square footage, and other basics.

  4. Features and upgrades: Remodeled bathrooms and kitchens can raise a home’s price, and so can less flashy upgrades like a new roof or HVAC system. Be sure to look for similar bells and whistles.

  5. Sale types: Homes that are sold as short sales or foreclosures are often in distress or sold at a lower price than they’d receive from a more typical sale. These homes are not as useful for comparisons.

     

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Upsizing Your Home

Posted On: March 3rd, 2020 10:27PM

Unfortunately, our homes don’t always grow with us. What may have initially worked fine for a single person, a young couple’s starter home, or a family with a newborn can quickly become too small as families expand and multiple generations live under one roof.

 

Remodeling and adding to your home is one option for creating more space, but it can be costly, and the size of your property may be prohibitive. That’s when moving to a bigger home becomes the best solution.

 

WHERE DO YOU NEED MORE SPACE?

The first thought when upsizing your home is to simply consider square footage, bedrooms, and bathrooms. But it’s important to take a more critical approach to how your space will actually be used. If you have younger children (or possibly more on the way), then focusing on bedrooms and bathrooms makes sense. But if your children are closer to heading off to college or starting their own families, it may be better to prioritize group spaces like the kitchen, dining room, living room, and outdoor space—it’ll pay off during the holidays or summer vacations, when everyone is coming to visit for big gatherings.

 

MOVING OUTWARD

If you need more space, but don’t necessarily want a more expensive home, you can probably get a lot more house for your money if you move a little further from a city center. While the walkability and short commutes of a dense neighborhood or condo are hard to leave beyond, your lifestyle—and preferences for hosting Thanksgiving, barbecues, and birthdays—might mean that a spacious home in the suburbs makes the most sense. It’s your best option for upsizing while avoiding a heftier price tag.

 

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What Effect Does a Recession Have on Home Values?

Posted On: September 16th, 2019 6:53PM

 

New analysis from Zillow shows that other than the housing-led Great Recession a decade ago, home values have continued to grow despite national and statewide recessions over the past 25 years. 

The U.S. is currently in its longest economic expansion, although growth has slowed in recent months. Zillow’s latest survey found that a panel of housing experts and economists expect that next recession to begin in Q3 2020. The respondents said the demand for housing is expected to cool during the next recession, but a housing slowdown will not be a significant factor. 

Zillow said there have been two national recessions over the past 23 years—the dot.com crash from March to November 2001 and the Great Recession from December 2007 to June 2009. 


While the Great Recession caused home prices to fall across the board, home values remained positive in all other cases. 


According to Zillow there have been 1,039 occurrences since 1997 of states being in a recession during any given month. Home-value appreciation was positive 81% of the time—the same rate when compared to times of economic expansion. 


Zillow also states that appreciation averaged 4.6% during economic expansion and 4% during recessionary periods. 


"The housing crash during the Great Recession left a lasting impression on our collective memory," said Zillow Economist Jeff Tucker. "But as we look ahead to the next recession, it's important to recognize how unusual the conditions were that caused the last one, and what's different about the housing market today. Rather than abundant homes, we have a shortage of new home supply. Rather than risky borrowers taking on adjustable-rate mortgages, we have buyers with sterling credit scores taking out predictable 30-year fixed-rate mortgages. The housing market is simply much less risky than it was 15 years ago, and our experience in recent localized recessions shows how home prices can weather normal economic headwinds."


Since the Great Recession ended in 2009, home prices have grown 50%, according to data from realtor.com. 


"Home prices are going up faster than incomes, and that's led to some of the affordability challenges that we see in the market," said Danielle Hale, Chief Economist of realtor.com. "Homes were basically on sale during the recession. ... [Today's high prices] create a bigger hurdle to get into the housing market."


Author: Mike Albanese


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Home Buying 101: Buyer's vs Listing Agent.

Posted On: August 6th, 2019 4:06AM


Buyer's agent - guides buyers through the home search and buying process and is legally bound to advocate for their rights and interests.

 

Listing Agent - Handles the proper pricing, marketing and negotiation for the sale of a home and has a fiduciary duty to the home seller. 

 

The seller typically pays the commission for both the listing agent and the buyer's agent.

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